Jaguar XE Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
I give you the definitive answer as detailed in the Owner's Handbook:

DIESEL EXHAUST FLUID (DEF)

In order to comply with exhaust emissions requirements, some vehicles with diesel engines are fitted with a reservoir containing Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF). In some markets, DEF is known as AdBlue®.

Note: It is a legal requirement that the DEF system is used correctly, as detailed in this handbook. It may be a criminal offence to run the vehicle when it is not consuming the correct specification of DEF.

DEF consumption can vary greatly dependent on driving style and conditions but the average rate of consumption is approximately 1 litre for every 1 600 km.

Note: When the DEF level becomes low, an appropriate message will be displayed in the Message centre. It is recommended to contact a Retailer/Authorised Repairer to arrange a DEF refill, at the earliest opportunity.

The Message centre will display a distance countdown, when the DEF level becomes too low. The DEF should be topped up before the distance range falls to zero. Failure to do so, will result in the vehicle failing to start.

DEF can be added to the reservoir by using the top-up procedure; however, a full system refill is still recommended at the earliest opportunity. Two standard sized non-drip refill bottles, each containing 1.89 litres of fluid, is the minimum amount required to restart the engine. Refill bottles are available from a Retailer/AuthorisedRepairer.

When refilling, make sure that the correct specification of DEF is used. Use of incorrect fluid could result in serious damage to the vehicle. Do not start the engine. Contact a Retailer/Authorised Repairer immediately.

Do not use DEF dispensing nozzles as used for commercial vehicles. The system is not designed to be filled under the pressure and flow-rate that such pumps dispense at and, therefore, damage could occur.

DEF can smell unpleasant and stain clothing or upholstery. Take care not to spill the fluid when performing a top-up procedure. In the event of spillage, rinse immediately with clean water. Read the label for safety precautions when using DEF.

DEF must be kept out of the reach of children.

DEF must be stored in the original container, in a cool, dry and well-ventilated area. Observe the manufacturer's storage and handling recommendations.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

AdBlue meeting ISO standard 22241-1 - Diesel exhaust fluid is also known as DEF, AdBlue, AUS 32 and ARLA 32

CAPACITIES

2.0L Diesel (163 PS) - 9 Litres
2.0L Diesel (180 PS) - 17 litres

Hope this answers your question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
I guess you're right:

DEF (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) is a 32.5% solution of Urea (NH2)2CO. When the urea solution is injected into the hot exhaust gas stream the water evaporates. The urea thermally decomposes to form ammonia and isocyanic acid:
(NH2)2CO → NH3 + HNCO
The Isocyanic acid hydrolyses to carbon dioxide and ammonia:
HNCO + H2O → CO2 + NH3
The overall reduction of NOx by urea is:
2(NH2)2CO + 4NO + O2 → 4N2 + 4H2O + 2CO2

But to be clear Urea, also called carbamide, is an organic chemical compound, and is essentially the waste produced by the body after metabolizing protein. Naturally, the compound is produced when the liver breaks down protein or amino acids, and ammonia; the kidneys then transfer the urea from the blood to the urine. Extra nitrogen is expelled from the body through urea, and because it is extremely soluble, it is a very efficient process. The average person excretes about 30 grams of urea a day, mostly through urine, but a small amount is also secreted in perspiration. Synthetic versions of the chemical compound can be created in liquid or solid form, and is often an ingredient found in fertilizers, animal feed, and diuretics, just to name a few.

Naturally, the chemical compound is not only produced by humans but also by many other mammals, as well as amphibians and some fish. Discovered in 1773 by the French chemist Hillaire Rouelle, urea became the first organic compound to be synthetically formulated. German chemist Friedrich Wöhler, one of the pioneers of organic chemistry, invented the process to create the synthetic version of the compound in 1828, just 55 years after its discovery.

The synthetic version of the compound is created from ammonia and carbon dioxide and can be produced as a liquid or a solid. In 1870, the process of producing the compound synthetically by dehydrating ammonium carbamate under conditions of high heat and pressure was invented, and this process is still used today. There are many common uses of the synthetic compound, and therefore its production is high.

I suggest Ad Blue could well be synthetically produced !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
bugsrunner said:
The adblue tank of the 180hp diesel engine is 17 liters? Can you confirm?
Yes it is. Initially Jag thought it would use about 1 litre per 1,000 miles but the dealer told me recently it's more like 1.4 to 1.5 litres per 1,000 miles. I am on nearly 10,000 now so will be expecting to top up soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Just had mine topped up!
5,500 miles
dealer said added 13 litres (funny tank only holds 9?) not the first time I have been lied to :x
Dealer said new cars only go out with 5 Litres to comply with emissions testing???

163 prestige
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Just had my adblue filled up. I've got the 180 diesel and the warning came on at 15,000 miles.

Just a warning to others, but I was told that the car would give a countdown (like fuel range) when it needed a refill, but all I got was a warning message one morning saying that it was low.

Dealer had the car for an hour, Possibly because I think it was the first one they'd had needing a refill, but it was dealt with really well and cleaned when they were done, so I was happy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Drive a 2.0l diesel and had mine done at 9,350ish. Amber warning light came on. Booked in at dealer next day and took an hour. Dealer said need to check level via diagnostic tool. I had used just over 9 litres and they said it holds 12 to 13. Dealer said that when the Amber light comes on, you have reached the warning level. You can run your car without filling ADBlue up...BUT IF YOU RUN OUT THEN THE CAR WILL NOT START until ADBlue added and computer reset.
You can do your own maths and take whatever risks you think are appropriate before getting it topped up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
totti said:
Did mine today. Put in 6 x 1.5 litre bottles. I think it would have taken more.
Was thinking of getting one of these to do a DIY job when needed:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cartec-9923-AdBlue-Exhaust-Aftertreatment/dp/B00SWLLS6Y/ref=pd_sim_sbs_263_2?ie=UTF8&dpID=41VMN3T%2BUdL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR134%2C160_&refRID=0NF5VHAXKVGCSHMESGF4

It has this "NOx-Reduktionsmittel gemäß AUS 32 (CEFIC) und DIN 70070-05, ISO 222 41-1" on the label so it looks the real deal and has been used by others on high-spec cars.

Wonder if I should get a smaller one as per totti's example as well and use that as a filler?
 
G

·
When I got my car I was told it was fuuly checked. Not ever having a car with Adblue I bought a bottle "just in case" A couple of weeks ago I thought I would put some in just to see how much I used. I only managed just under a quarter of a bottle, so my dealer did top it all up as stated at the point of sale.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top